Faculty & Staff

Intisar A. Rabb
Faculty Director
Intisar A. RabbFaculty Director

Professor Intisar A. Rabb is a Professor of Law, Professor of History, and the Faculty Director of the Program in Islamic Law at Harvard Law School. She has held appointments as a Susan S. and Kenneth L. Wallach Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, as an Associate Professor at NYU Department of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies and at NYU Law School, and as an Assistant Professor at Boston College Law School. She previously served as a law clerk for Judge Thomas L. Ambro of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, as a Temple Bar Fellow in London with the American Inns of Court, and as a Carnegie Scholar for her work on contemporary Islamic law.

In 2015, in partnership with the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society, support from the Luce and MacArthur Foundations, and collaborations with myriad scholars and institutions, she launched SHARIAsource – an online portal designed to provide universal access to the world’s information on Islamic law and history, and to facilitate new research with the use of AI tools.

She has published on Islamic law in historical and modern contexts, including the monograph, Doubt in Islamic Law (Cambridge University Press 2015), the edited volumes, Justice and Leadership in Early Islamic Courts (with Abigail Balbale, Harvard University Press, 2017) and Law and Tradition in Classical Islamic Thought (with Michael Cook et al., Palgrave 2013), and numerous articles on Islamic constitutionalism, on Islamic legal canons, and on the early history of the Qur'an text.

She received a BA from Georgetown University, a JD from Yale Law School, and an MA and PhD from Princeton University. She has conducted research in Egypt, Iran, Syria, and elsewhere.

Mona Rahmani
Associate Director
Mona RahmaniAssociate Director

Mona Rahmani is the Associate Director of the Program in Islamic Law. Prior to joining PIL, Mona Rahmani’s experience has crossed multiple sectors and industries, including most recently as a Due Diligence Expert with the Dow Jones data strategy group in Princeton specializing in sanctions research, Western Asia, and Sub-Saharan Africa. She was previously Senior Research Specialist at Princeton University’s Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Iran and Persian Gulf Studies directing the Center’s inaugural years of academic programs and projects. She also consults for the Economist Intelligence Unit and has previously worked pro bono on Chios Island, Greece serving Vial Refugee Camp, for the World Bank field-based in Tehran, with non-profit FHI-360, and as a Princeton in Asia Fellow at Universiti Sains Malaysia in Penang. Her academic degrees comprise of an individualized MSt in modern Global South political thought & theory from the University of Oxford at St Antony’s College, an MHS in international health with a certificate in humanitarian assistance from Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, and a BA in international relations from Boston University. Her policy and research interests include the intersections of Islamic law and international development mechanisms, state strategy for refugee camps, and Middle East - Sub Saharan Africa relations.

 e-mail: mrahmani@law.harvard.edu
Miriam Silva
Program Assistant
Miriam SilvaProgram Assistant

Miriam Silva provides support to programming and administration as program assistant at the Program in Islamic Law.

 e-mail: msilva@law.harvard.edu 
 
William Alford
Harvard Law School
William AlfordHarvard Law School

William P. Alford is the Vice Dean for the Graduate Program and International Legal Studies and the Jerome A. and Joan L. Cohen Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. He is a scholar of Chinese law and legal history. His books include To Steal a Book is an Elegant Offense: Intellectual Property Law in Chinese Civilization (Stanford University Press 1995), Raising the Bar: The Emerging Legal Profession in East Asia (Harvard East Asian Legal Studies 2007), 残疾人法律保障机制研究 (A Study of Legal Mechanisms to Protect Persons with Disabilities) (Huaxia Press 2008, with Wang Liming and Ma Yu’er), Prospects for the Professions in China (Routledge 2011, with William Kirby and Kenneth Winston) and Taiwan and International Human Rights: A Story of Transformation (Springer 2018, with Jerome Cohen and Lo Chang-fa).

Professor Alford is the founding Chair of the Harvard Law School Project on Disability which provides pro bono services on issues of disability in China, Bangladesh, the Philippines, Vietnam and several other nations. He is Lead Director and Chair of the Executive Committee of the Board of Directors of Special Olympics International (which serves individuals with intellectual disabilities in more than 170 jurisdictions around the world). In 2008, Special Olympics honored him for his work for persons with intellectual disabilities in China.

Professor Alford was awarded an honorary doctorate in law by the University of Geneva in 2010 and has been an honorary professor or fellow at Renmin University of China, Zhejiang University, the National College of Administration, and the Institute of Law of the Chinese Academy of Social Science. Among other honors are the inaugural O’Melveny & Myers Centennial Award, the Kluwer China Prize, the Qatar Pearls of Praise Award, an Abe (Japan) Fellowship, and the Harvard Law School Alumni Association Award. In 2008, he was a finalist for Harvard Law School’s Sacks-Freund Teaching Award.

Professor Alford has delivered endowed lectureships at leading universities around the world and serves on university advisory boards and the editorial boards of learned journals in several jurisdictions. A member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the National Committee on US-China relations, Professor Alford has been a dispute resolution panelist under the U.S.-Canada Free Trade Agreement and the North American Free Trade Agreement. He has served as a consultant or advisor to multilateral organizations, various offices of the United States government, members of Congress, foreign governments, foundations, companies and not-for-profit organizations.

Professor Alford is a graduate of Amherst College (B.A.), the University of Cambridge (LL.B.), Yale University (graduate degrees in History and in East Asian Studies) and Harvard Law School (J.D.).

Chris Bavitz
Harvard Law School
Chris BavitzHarvard Law School

Christopher T. Bavitz is the WilmerHale Clinical Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. He is also Managing Director of HLS’s Cyberlaw Clinic, based at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society. And, he is a Faculty Co-Director of the Berkman Klein Center. Chris teaches the Counseling and Legal Strategy in the Digital Age and Music & Digital Media seminars, and he concentrates his practice activities on intellectual property and media law (particularly in the areas of music, entertainment, and technology).

He oversees many of the Cyberlaw Clinic’s projects relating to copyright, speech, advising of startups, and the use of technology to support access to justice, and he serves as the HLS Dean’s Designate to Harvard’s Innovation Lab. Chris's research and related work at the Berkman Klein Center addresses intermediary liability and online content takedown regimes as well as regulatory, ethical, and governance issues associated with technologies that incorporate algorithms, machine learning, and artificial intelligence.

Erik Buunk
Institute Fellow, IQSS
Erik BuunkInstitute Fellow, IQSS
Erik Buunk joined IQSS in August 2019 as an Institute Fellow and he is working on IQSS affiliated Scientific Programs. Current projects are: the Automated History Archive (by Melissa Dell, Department of Economics) and the Shariasource project of the Harvard Law School (by Intisar Rabb). He is also involved in internal IQSS projects such as the improvement of metrics, the cross check of user stories for the migration of the computer cluster environments (RCE to Sid) and the development of a data visualization for the Harvard Dataverse homepage. Later this year he will be starting research in data science and data visualization. Before IQSS, Erik has worked for governmental organizations as an Information Consultant, Project Manager, and Business Analyst. His main focus was to bridge the gap between the needs of end users and the technical implementation, and he was looking for improvements in work processes either through better technical solutions or smarter workflows. Erik has a master's in Environmental Science and experience in IT implementations, software development, SCRUM and Lean/Six Sigma and graphic design.
Matthew Cook
Harvard Library
Matthew CookHarvard Library

Matthew Cook is a Digital Scholarship Program Manager for the Harvard Library. In this role, he creates digital tools and supports faculty, staff, and students in the use of emerging computational methods. Before coming to Harvard, he worked as Head of Emerging Technologies for the University of Oklahoma Libraries. Cook’s interests include digital scholarship and 3D technologies, including virtual reality. His work has been published in the Journal of Academic Librarianship, Journal of Library Administration, and other journals. He holds an MLIS from the School of Library and Information Science at the University of Oklahoma.

Cole Crawford
Arts and Humanities Research Computing
Cole CrawfordArts and Humanities Research Computing

Cole Crawford is a Humanities Research Computing Specialist with Arts and Humanities Research Computing (DARTH) at Harvard University, supporting the work of students, faculty, and staff in digital humanities methods and other technologies. Crawford received a BS in Computing Science and Informatics and English from Creighton University and an MA in English (Literature & Culture) from Oregon State University. His research has been published in A History of British Working Class Literature (ed. John Goodridge and Bridget Keegan, Cambridge University Press 2017).

Sebastian Diaz
Technology Coordinator
Sebastian DiazTechnology Coordinator

Sebastian Diaz is the Berkman Klein Center's Directory of Technology and he coordinates and advises the Program in Islamic Law on its digital projects. He guides the Berkman Klein Center's IT enterprise through a landscape of ever-changing technology and priorities. Sebastian manages its technology group, which consists of a Harvard renowned development team, an infrastructure and workplace computing team, and a technical project management team.

Gayle Fischer
Librarian for Islamic Law, HLS
Gayle FischerLibrarian for Islamic Law, HLS

Gayle Fischer joined the Harvard Law School Library in 2016 as the Librarian for Islamic Law. She is primarily responsible for the selection, cataloging, and management of materials for the Islamic and Middle Eastern law collections, in addition to providing reference and instruction services. As a member of the Middle East Librarians Association, she serves on the Web and Social Media Committee and the Metrics Working Group. She obtained her B.A. in Philosophy and Arabic Language and Literature from Portland State University and holds an M.A. in Middle Eastern Studies and an M.S.I.S. from the University of Texas at Austin. Her professional and research interests include digital scholarship/digital humanities, ontology(-ies), and Arabic poetry.

Jessica Fjeld
Cyberlaw Clinic
Jessica FjeldCyberlaw Clinic

Jessica Fjeld is a Clinical Instructor at Harvard Law School’s Cyberlaw Clinic and serves as the Clinic’s Assistant Director. She is also a Lecturer on Law at HLS. She works in diverse areas including intellectual property, media and entertainment (particularly public media), freedom of expression, and law and policy relating to government and nonprofit entities. She works with SHARIAsource on copyright law and matters of intellectual property and technology. 

She received a JD from Columbia Law School, where she was a James Kent Scholar and Managing Editor of the Journal of Law and the Arts; an MFA in Poetry from the University of Massachusetts; and a BA from Columbia University.

Kevin Garewal
HLS Library
Kevin GarewalHLS Library

Kevin Garewal is the Associate Director for Collection Development and Digital Initiatives at the Harvard Law School Library. He works with the Program in Islamic Law on the StackLife Digital Library project and on other digitization efforts. His writing has appeared in the Journal of Academic Librarianship and Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Electronic Reserve, and he has presented at several regional and national conferences. Before joining Harvard Law School Library, Garewal worked at the University of Akron, the Cleveland Marshall College of Law, and Harvard Business School.

Urs Gasser
Berkman Klein Center
Urs GasserBerkman Klein Center

Urs Gasser is a Professor of Practice at Harvard Law School and the Executive Director of the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society. His research, teaching, and other efforts cover a wide range of issues in technology and policy, including artificial intelligence, augmented and virtual reality, the internet of things, and legal innovation. Among other books, Gasser has co-authored, with John Palfrey, Born Digital: How Children Grow Up in a Digital Age (2008, rev. 2016), Interoperability: The Promise and Perils of Highly Interconnected Systems (2012), and The Connected Parent: An Expert Guide to Parenting in a Digital World (2020). He is also the author or co-author of over 100 scholarly articles and book chapters. He graduated with an SJD from the University of St. Gallen and an LLM from Harvard Law School, and he has held visiting professorships at Keio University, the University of St. Gallen, the University of Zürich, and Singapore Management University.

Elizabeth Hess
Executive Director, IQSS
Elizabeth HessExecutive Director, IQSS

Elizabeth Hess is the Executive Director of the Institute for Quantitative Social Science (IQSS). In partnership with the IQSS Faculty Director, Gary King, she is responsible for overall strategic, programmatic, and financial management of IQSS, working across the organization to ensure delivery of first-class research and administrative infrastructure to support its constituents.   In addition, she oversees programmatic activities including software development projects, cloud computing resources, internal and external collaborations, and new program development. 

Elizabeth graduated from the University of Pennsylvania and earned a masters degree from Harvard’s Graduate School of Education.  She is actively pursuing a Sustainability Degree from Harvard University’s Extension School. 

Jocelyn Kennedy
HLS Library
Jocelyn KennedyHLS Library

Jocelyn Kennedy is the Executive Director of the Harvard Law School Library where she oversees the day to day operations of the law library. An expert in legal research, she is interested in the impact the evolution of search platforms has on the habits of legal researchers. She is also researching the disparity in promotion trajectory between men and women in the field of librarianship, a workforce dominated by females. Prior to joining the Harvard Law School Library, Kennedy served as the Library Director at the University of Connecticut School of Law, and was the faculty research librarian at the University of Michigan. Prior to her career in librarianship, she served as a congressional staff and was a law clerk for the New Hampshire Superior Court. She has a JD from the University of New Hampshire and an MLIS from the University of Washington.

Gary King
Harvard University
Gary KingHarvard University

Gary King is the Albert J. Weatherhead III University Professor and the Director of the Institute for Quantitative Social Science (IQSS) at Harvard University. One of the most influential political scientists of his generation, his work has been influential in fields from legislative redistricting to public health programs, and from social security to government censorship. He is the author of several books and articles, including A Solution to the Ecological Inference Problem: Reconstructing Individual Behavior from Aggregate Data (Princeton University Press 1997) and Unifying Political Methodology: The Likelihood Theory of Statistical Inference (Cambridge University Press 1989). He is also the co-founder of several technology firms, including Crimson Hexagon (now part of Brandwatch), Learning Catalytics (now part of Pearson), OpenScholar, Perusall, and Thresher. He graduated with his PhD from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. More information is available at King's faculty website.

Thomas Ma
Harvard Library
Thomas MaHarvard Library

Thomas Ma is a Cataloging Manager in Metadata Creation for Professional Schools at Harvard Library. He has worked in the library system at Harvard since 1999, with experience at Harvard Law School Library and other libraries. He holds an MA and an MLIS.

Rashmi Singhal
Harvard Library
Rashmi SinghalHarvard Library

Rashmi Singhal is the Director of Arts and Humanities Research Computing at Harvard University. With a background in software development, she works to promote and expand the use of digital humanities methods in teaching and research. Singhal previously worked on the HarvardX online learning platform, and before coming to Harvard, she worked at the New England Journal of Medicine, Library of Congress, and Tufts University. She holds degrees in computer science and in archaeology.

Martha Whitehead
Harvard Library
Martha WhiteheadHarvard Library

Martha Whitehead is the Vice President for the Harvard Library and University Librarian, and Roy E. Larsen Librarian for the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, at Harvard University. Before coming to Harvard, she was the Vice-Provost (Digital Planning) and University Librarian at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. She also worked for 19 years at the University of British Columbia Library in Vancouver. Whitehead is the past president of the Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL), and she received CARL Distinguished Service to Research Librarianship Award in 2019. Her work has been published in the Journal of Academic Librarianship and other journals, and she holds a BA and MLS from the University of British Columbia.

Suzanne Wones
Harvard Library
Suzanne WonesHarvard Library

Suzanne Wones is the Associate University Librarian for Digital Strategies and Innovation at Harvard Library. In this role, she leads the library’s data, technology, and digital strategy efforts. Before her current role, she served as the Executive Director of the Harvard Law School Library from 2012 to 2015, and previously worked in other positions in the libraries at Harvard University. Suzanne earned her MS in Information, Library and Information Services from the University of Michigan, and holds other degrees from the University of New Hampshire and University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

Jonathan Zittrain
Harvard University
Jonathan ZittrainHarvard University

Jonathan Zittrain is the George Bemis Professor of International Law at Harvard Law School and the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, and Professor of Computer Science at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. He is also the Director of the Harvard Law School Library and Vice Dean for Library and Information Resources, and he is Co-Founder, Director, and Faculty Chair of the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society. Zittrain conducts research, writes, and teaches courses on cyber law, intellectual property, privacy law, artificial intelligence, and other topics. He is the author of The Future of the Internet and How to Stop It (Yale University Press 2008), and his articles have appeared in academic journals, including the Harvard Law Review, Harvard Journal of Law and Technology, and University of Chicago Law Review, and in other publications, including The Atlantic and The New York Times. More information is available on his website, www.jz.org.

Research Fellows

Sohaib Baig
Incoming Research Fellow, 2020–2021
Sohaib BaigIncoming Research Fellow, 2020–2021

Sohaib Baig is completing his PhD in the Department of History at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is interested broadly in connected intellectual and social histories of Islam across South Asia, the Indian Ocean, and the Middle East in the early modern and modern period.

Sohaib's book project is based on his dissertation, entitled "Indian Hanafis in an Ocean of Hadith: Islamic Legal Authority between South Asia and the Arabian Peninsula, 16th - 20th Centuries." It examines how Indian Hanafis from Sindh and Delhi maneuvered across imperial geographies to pursue hadith scholarship and engage multiple legal schools (madhhabs) in the Indian Ocean. It analyzes how such transregional exchanges produced immense debate on the authority of the Islamic legal school and the usage of hadith as legal evidence, leading to the formation of new Islamic legal institutions in the modern period.

Sohaib has conducted archival research in Pakistan, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Netherlands, and the UK.

Students

Omar Abdel-Ghaffar
Research Assistant
Omar Abdel-GhaffarResearch Assistant

Omar Abdel-Ghaffar is a PhD Candidate in the History and Middle East Studies program at Harvard's Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

Aaron Dunn
Research Assistant
Aaron DunnResearch Assistant
Aaron Dunn is a rising 3L at Harvard Law School.
Jason Golfinos
Research Assistant
Jason GolfinosResearch Assistant
Jason Golfinos is a rising 2L at Harvard Law School.
Stephanie Gullo
Research Assistant
Stephanie GulloResearch Assistant

Stephanie Gullo is a rising 2L at Harvard Law School.

Daniel Jacobs
Research Assistant
Daniel JacobsResearch Assistant

Daniel Jacobs is a PhD Candidate in History at Harvard's Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

Abdelrahman Mahmoud
Research Assistant
Abdelrahman MahmoudResearch Assistant

Abdelrahman Mahmoud is a PhD Candidate in the History and Middle East Studies program at Harvard's Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

Saqib Qureshi
Research Assistant
Saqib QureshiResearch Assistant

Saqib Qureshi is an MTS Candidate at Harvard Divinity School.

Abtsam Saleh
Research Assistant
Abtsam SalehResearch Assistant
Abtsam Saleh is a PhD Student at Harvard's Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.
Cem Tecimer
Research Assistant
Cem TecimerResearch Assistant

Cem Tecimer is an SJD Candidate at Harvard Law School.

Marzieh Tofighi Darian
Research Assistant
Marzieh Tofighi DarianResearch Assistant

Marzieh Tofighi Darian is an SJD Candidate at Harvard Law School.

Asma Khoshmehr
Research Assistant
Asma KhoshmehrResearch Assistant

Asma Khoshmehr is a MFA student at Emerson College.

Salaam Sbini
Research Assistant
Salaam SbiniResearch Assistant

Salaam Sbini is an MTS student at Harvard Divinity School. 

Advisors

William Alford
Harvard Law School
William AlfordHarvard Law School

William P. Alford is the Vice Dean for the Graduate Program and International Legal Studies and the Jerome A. and Joan L. Cohen Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. He is a scholar of Chinese law and legal history. His books include To Steal a Book is an Elegant Offense: Intellectual Property Law in Chinese Civilization (Stanford University Press 1995), Raising the Bar: The Emerging Legal Profession in East Asia (Harvard East Asian Legal Studies 2007), 残疾人法律保障机制研究 (A Study of Legal Mechanisms to Protect Persons with Disabilities) (Huaxia Press 2008, with Wang Liming and Ma Yu’er), Prospects for the Professions in China (Routledge 2011, with William Kirby and Kenneth Winston) and Taiwan and International Human Rights: A Story of Transformation (Springer 2018, with Jerome Cohen and Lo Chang-fa).

Professor Alford is the founding Chair of the Harvard Law School Project on Disability which provides pro bono services on issues of disability in China, Bangladesh, the Philippines, Vietnam and several other nations. He is Lead Director and Chair of the Executive Committee of the Board of Directors of Special Olympics International (which serves individuals with intellectual disabilities in more than 170 jurisdictions around the world). In 2008, Special Olympics honored him for his work for persons with intellectual disabilities in China.

Professor Alford was awarded an honorary doctorate in law by the University of Geneva in 2010 and has been an honorary professor or fellow at Renmin University of China, Zhejiang University, the National College of Administration, and the Institute of Law of the Chinese Academy of Social Science. Among other honors are the inaugural O’Melveny & Myers Centennial Award, the Kluwer China Prize, the Qatar Pearls of Praise Award, an Abe (Japan) Fellowship, and the Harvard Law School Alumni Association Award. In 2008, he was a finalist for Harvard Law School’s Sacks-Freund Teaching Award.

Professor Alford has delivered endowed lectureships at leading universities around the world and serves on university advisory boards and the editorial boards of learned journals in several jurisdictions. A member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the National Committee on US-China relations, Professor Alford has been a dispute resolution panelist under the U.S.-Canada Free Trade Agreement and the North American Free Trade Agreement. He has served as a consultant or advisor to multilateral organizations, various offices of the United States government, members of Congress, foreign governments, foundations, companies and not-for-profit organizations.

Professor Alford is a graduate of Amherst College (B.A.), the University of Cambridge (LL.B.), Yale University (graduate degrees in History and in East Asian Studies) and Harvard Law School (J.D.).

Rashid Alvi
NovoPath, Inc.
Rashid AlviNovoPath, Inc.

Rashid Alvi is the Chairman of the Board of Directors for Muslim Advocates. Mr. Alvi currently serves as Chief Strategy Officer and V.P. of Operations at NovoPath, Inc. Mr. Alvi formerly served as Managing Director of the Harvard Capital Group. Prior to his post at the Harvard Capital group, Mr. Alvi was the Deputy Director of the Islamic Legal Studies Program (ILSP) at Harvard Law School. Prior to Harvard Capital Group and ILSP, at the law firm of Davis Polk & Wardwell, Mr. Alvi specialized in mergers and acquisitions. He then moved to Wall Street, working at Lehman Brothers and Goldman Sachs. He subsequently joined Acro Healthcare, LLC, a privately held start-up company in the specialty pharmaceuticals industry, in an executive capacity. After helping the company grow, Mr. Alvi advised on its sale to Lincare, Inc., a public company. Following the sale of Acro, Mr. Alvi worked as a principal at a boutique business advisory firm, where he continues to consult from time to time. Mr. Alvi holds a J.D. from Columbia Law School, an M.A. from the University of Southern California, and a B.A. from Binghamton University.

Chris Bavitz
Harvard Berkman Klein Center
Chris BavitzHarvard Berkman Klein Center

Christopher T. Bavitz is the WilmerHale Clinical Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. He is also Managing Director of HLS’s Cyberlaw Clinic, based at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society. And, he is a Faculty Co-Director of the Berkman Klein Center. Chris teaches the Counseling and Legal Strategy in the Digital Age and Music & Digital Media seminars, and he concentrates his practice activities on intellectual property and media law (particularly in the areas of music, entertainment, and technology).

He oversees many of the Cyberlaw Clinic’s projects relating to copyright, speech, advising of startups, and the use of technology to support access to justice, and he serves as the HLS Dean’s Designate to Harvard’s Innovation Lab. Chris's research and related work at the Berkman Klein Center addresses intermediary liability and online content takedown regimes as well as regulatory, ethical, and governance issues associated with technologies that incorporate algorithms, machine learning, and artificial intelligence.

Naz K. Modirzadeh
Harvard Law School
Naz K. ModirzadehHarvard Law School

Naz K. Modirzadeh is the founding Director of the Harvard Law School Program on International Law and Armed Conflict (HLS PILAC). In May 2016, she was appointed as a Professor of Practice at Harvard Law School. In the Spring 2019 term, she will teach International Humanitarian Law/Laws of War, Counterterrorism and International Law, and Public International Law. At HLS PILAC, Modirzadeh is responsible for overall direction of the Program, contributing to its cutting-edge research initiatives and briefing senior decision-makers.

Will Smiley
University of New Hampshire
Will SmileyUniversity of New Hampshire
Will Smiley is Assistant Professor in the Humanities Program at the University of New Hampshire. He is a historian of the Middle East, Eurasia, the Ottoman Empire, and international law; previously served as an Assistant Professor of History and Humanities at Reed College; and has held post-doctoral fellowships at Princeton and New York University. His first book, From Slaves to Prisoners of War: The Ottoman Empire, Russia, and International Law (Oxford University Press, 2018), examines the emergence of rules of warfare surrounding captivity and slavery in the context of the centuries-long rivalry between the Ottoman and Russian empires, which defined the future of the Middle East and Eurasia. His other publications include articles in the Law and History Review, International Journal of Middle East Studies, Journal of the History of International Law, Journal of the Ottoman and Turkish Studies Association, Journal of Ottoman Studies, Turkish Historical Review, and International History Review. He received a BA from Hillsdale College, an MA from the University of Utah, a PhD from the University of Cambridge, and a JD from Yale Law School.

Affiliates

Rosie Bsheer
Harvard University
Rosie BsheerHarvard University

Rosie Bsheer is an historian of the modern Middle East and Assistant Professor of History at Harvard University. Her teaching and research interests center on Arab intellectual and social movements, petro-capitalism and state formation, and the production of historical knowledge and commemorative spaces. 

William A. Graham
Harvard Divinity School (emeritus)
William A. GrahamHarvard Divinity School (emeritus)

William A. Graham is Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor, and Murray A. Albertson Professor of Middle Eastern Studies (Faculty of Arts and Sciences). Graham served as Dean of Harvard Divinity School from 2002 to 2012, when he stepped down to return to research and teaching. His scholarly work has focused on early Islamic religious history and textual traditions (Qur’an and Hadith), and on topics in the global history of religion. His book Divine Word and Prophetic Word in Early Islam was awarded the American Council of Learned Societies History of Religions Prize in 1978. He is the author of Beyond the Written Word: Oral Aspects of Scripture in the History of Religion (1987) and Islamic and Comparative Religious Studies(2010). He has co-authored three books and is also the author of numerous articles and reviews. He is a summa graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and holds honorary doctorates from UNC and Lehigh University.

Baber Johansen
Harvard Divinity School (emeritus)
Baber JohansenHarvard Divinity School (emeritus)

Baber Johansen was appointed Professor of Islamic Religious Studies at Harvard Divinity School in 2005. Prior to his appointment, he served as Directeur d’études at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (Centre d’étude des normes juridiques), Paris (1995–2005), and Professor for Islamic Studies at the Freie Universität Berlin (1972–1995). In 2006 he was appointed an affiliated professor at Harvard Law School and acting director of its Islamic Legal Studies Program from 2006 to 2010. In 2007 he was affiliated with the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, and from July 2010 to June 2013, he was the director of the Center for Middle Eastern Studies. He is also a faculty associate of Harvard’s Weatherhead Center for International Affairs and a member of its Executive Committee.

Cemal Kafadar
Harvard History Department
Cemal KafadarHarvard History Department

Cemal Kafadar is the Vehbi Koç Professor of Turkish Studies at Harvard University. Prof. Kafadar is interested in the social and cultural history of the Middle East and southeastern Europe in the late medieval/early modern era. He teaches courses on Ottoman history, urban space, travel, popular culture, history and cinema. His latest publications include “How Dark is the History of the Night, How Black the Story of Coffee, How Bitter the Tale of Love: the Changing Measure of Leisure and Pleasure in Early Modern Istanbul” and “Evliya Celebi in Dalmatia: an Ottoman Traveler’s Encounters with the Arts of the Franks.” 

Ousmane Kane
Harvard Divinity School
Ousmane KaneHarvard Divinity School

Ousmane Kane, a scholar of Islamic studies and comparative and Islamic politics, joined Harvard Divinity School in July 2012 as the first Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Professor of Contemporary Islamic Religion and Society at HDS. Since 2002, he was an associate professor of international and public affairs at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs. He is a member of a number of professional organizations, including the African Studies Association of North America and the Council for the Development of Social and Economic Research in Africa. Kane studies the history of Islamic religious institutions and organizations since the eighteenth century, and he is engaged in documenting the intellectual history of Islam in Africa.

Asim Ijaz Khwaja
Harvard Kennedy School
Asim Ijaz KhwajaHarvard Kennedy School

Asim Ijaz Khwaja is the Sumitomo-Foundation for Advanced Studies on International Development Professor of International Finance and Development at the Harvard Kennedy School, and Co-Director of Evidence for Policy Design (EPoD). His areas of interest include economic development, finance, education, political economy, institutions, and contract theory/mechanism design. His research combines extensive fieldwork, rigorous empirical analysis, and microeconomic theory to answer questions that are motivated by and engage with policy. His recent work ranges from understanding market failures in emerging financial markets to examining the private education market in low-income countries. He was selected as a Carnegie Scholar in 2009 to pursue research on how religious institutions impact individual beliefs. Khwaja received BS degrees in economics and in mathematics with computer science from MIT and a PhD in economics from Harvard.

Tarek Masoud
Harvard Kennedy School
Tarek MasoudHarvard Kennedy School

Tarek Masoud is the Sultan of Oman Associate Professor of International Relations at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. His research focuses on the role of religion in the Muslim world’s political development. He is the author of Counting Islam: Religion, Class, and Elections in Egypt (Cambridge University Press, 2014), the co-author of The Arab Spring: Pathways of Repression and Reform (Oxford University Press, 2015), as well as of several articles and book chapters. He is a 2009 Carnegie Scholar, a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations, a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Democracy, and the recipient of grants from the National Science Foundation and the Paul and Daisy Soros foundation, among others. He holds an AB from Brown and a PhD from Yale, both in political science.

Roy Mottahedeh
Harvard University (emeritus)
Roy MottahedehHarvard University (emeritus)

Roy Parviz Mottahedeh is the Gurney Professor of History, Emeritus, at Harvard University.  He served as the Director of the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at Harvard University from 1987 to 1990 and founded the Harvard Middle East and Islamic Review as a medium for Harvard students and teachers to publish their work. He was elected a member of the Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Council on Foreign Relations and has served as a series editor for several academic publishers. In 1994 he was appointed Gurney Professor of History. Together with Angeliki Laiou he co-edited The Crusades from the Perspective of Byzantium and the Muslim World (2001). His book Lessons in Islamic Jurisprudence, published in 2003, studies the philosophy of Islamic law as taught in Shi’ite seminaries. Professor Mottahedeh received an honorary degree from the University of Lund, Sweden, in 2006. He served as Director of the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Islamic Studies Program at Harvard from 2006 to 2011.

Professor Mottahedeh is the author of numerous articles that demonstrate his wide range of interests from the Abbasid period in the eighth century to Islamic revival movements of the present day. One of his most widely distributed articles, which has been translated into many languages, was his critique of Huntington’s theory of the clash of civilizations. Professor Mottahedeh’s other publications consider such diverse topics as the transmission of learning in the Muslim world, the social bonds that connected people in the early Islamic Middle East, the theme of “wonders” in The Thousand and One Nights, the concept of jihad in the early Islamic period, and perceptions of Persepolis among later Muslims.

Malika Zeghal
Harvard NELC Department
Malika ZeghalHarvard NELC Department

Malika Zeghal is the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Professor in contemporary Islamic thought and life at Harvard and studies religion through the lens of Islam and power. She is particularly interested in Islamist movements and in the institutionalization of Islam in the Muslim world, with special focus on the Middle East and North Africa in the postcolonial period and on Muslim diasporas in North America and Western Europe. She has more general interests in the circulation and role of religious ideologies in situations of conflict and/or dialogue. She has published a study of central religious institutions in Egypt, Gardiens de l’Islam, (1996), and a volume on Islam and politics in Morocco, Islamism in Morocco: Religion, Authoritarianism, and Electoral Politics (2008), which has won the French Voices-Pen American Center Award. She is currently working on a book on states, secularity, and Islam in the contemporary Arab world.