Faculty & Staff

Intisar A. Rabb
Faculty Director
Intisar A. RabbFaculty Director

Professor Intisar A. Rabb is a Professor of Law, Professor of History, and the Faculty Director of the Program in Islamic Law at Harvard Law School. She has held appointments as a Susan S. and Kenneth L. Wallach Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, as an Associate Professor at NYU Department of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies and at NYU Law School, and as an Assistant Professor at Boston College Law School. She previously served as a law clerk for Judge Thomas L. Ambro of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, as a Temple Bar Fellow in London with the American Inns of Court, and as a Carnegie Scholar for her work on contemporary Islamic law.

In 2015, in partnership with the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society, support from the Luce and MacArthur Foundations, and collaborations with myriad scholars and institutions, she launched SHARIAsource – an online portal designed to provide universal access to the world’s information on Islamic law and history, and to facilitate new research with the use of AI tools.

She has published on Islamic law in historical and modern contexts, including the monograph, Doubt in Islamic Law (Cambridge University Press 2015), the edited volumes, Justice and Leadership in Early Islamic Courts (with Abigail Balbale, Harvard University Press, 2017) and Law and Tradition in Classical Islamic Thought (with Michael Cook et al., Palgrave 2013), and numerous articles on Islamic constitutionalism, on Islamic legal canons, and on the early history of the Qur'an text.

She received a BA from Georgetown University, a JD from Yale Law School, and an MA and PhD from Princeton University. She has conducted research in Egypt, Iran, Syria, and elsewhere.

Anne Brown
Faculty and Program Assistant (On leave)
Anne BrownFaculty and Program Assistant (On leave)

Anne is Assistant to Professor Rabb and the Program in Islamic Law. She received her JD from Harvard Law School (2018) and AB from Princeton (2013).

[email protected]

Simon Loynes
Research Editor, 2020-2022
Simon LoynesResearch Editor, 2020-2022

Simon is a Research Editor at the Program in Islamic Law. He has previously worked as part of the Knowledge, Information Technology, and the Arabic Book project at the Aga Khan University, London. He is a specialist in the Qur’an and is particularly interested in its literary aspects, its relationship to early Arabic poetry, and its place in Late Antiquity. His research also applies Digital Humanities methodologies to the study of the Qur’an, and he interested, more broadly, in the digitisation of Arabic texts and the challenges presented by building large-scale digital corpora.

His first monograph, "Revelation in the Qur’an," investigates the Qur’anic concept of revelation through the roots n-z-l and w-ḥ-y, was published in early 2021 in Brill’s Texts and Studies on the Qurʾān series (Brill, 2021).

He holds a PhD in Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies from the University of Edinburgh (2019) and a MA in Islamic Societies and Cultures from the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London (2014). 

Yusuf Celik
Data Scientist, 2020-2021
Yusuf CelikData Scientist, 2020-2021

Yusuf Celik is the incoming Data Science Fellow for 2021-2022. He  is currently an adjunct lecturer and researcher at the University of Utrecht.

His research is on Philosophical Hermeneutics in the Islamic tradition and Continental philosophy. Yusuf Celik has also been active for years in the field of software engineering. As an independent contractor he has worked for different high profile clients in the capacity of lead developer, consultant, code coach, and Scrum master. He is currently exploring ways to synthesize insights from Philosophical Hermeneutics with new technologies such as Deep Learning.

Celik received his PhD from the University of Edinburgh in 2020.

Cole Crawford
Arts & Humanities Research Computing Specialist
Cole CrawfordArts & Humanities Research Computing Specialist

Cole Crawford is a Software Engineer in Humanities Research Computing with Arts and Humanities Research Computing (DARTH) at Harvard University, supporting the work of students, faculty, and staff in digital humanities methods and other technologies.

His research has been published in A History of British Working Class Literature (ed. John Goodridge and Bridget Keegan, Cambridge University Press 2017).

Crawford received a BS in Computing Science and Informatics and English from Creighton University and an MA in English (Literature & Culture) from Oregon State University. 

Abtsam Saleh
Acting Program Assistant
Abtsam SalehActing Program Assistant

Abtsam Saleh is the Acting Program Assistant and Outreach Student Fellow at the Program in Islamic Law. She is a PhD Student at Harvard's Graduate School of Arts and Sciences in the Committee on the Study of Religion.

William Alford
Harvard Law School
William AlfordHarvard Law School

William P. Alford is the Vice Dean for the Graduate Program and International Legal Studies and the Jerome A. and Joan L. Cohen Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. He is a scholar of Chinese law and legal history. He is the founding Chair of the Harvard Law School Project on Disability which provides pro bono services on issues of disability in China, Bangladesh, the Philippines, Vietnam and several other nations. He is Lead Director and Chair of the Executive Committee of the Board of Directors of Special Olympics International (which serves individuals with intellectual disabilities in more than 170 jurisdictions around the world). In 2008, Special Olympics honored him for his work for persons with intellectual disabilities in China.

Professor Alford was awarded an honorary doctorate in law by the University of Geneva in 2010 and has been an honorary professor or fellow at Renmin University of China, Zhejiang University, the National College of Administration, and the Institute of Law of the Chinese Academy of Social Science. Among other honors are the inaugural O’Melveny & Myers Centennial Award, the Kluwer China Prize, the Qatar Pearls of Praise Award, an Abe (Japan) Fellowship, and the Harvard Law School Alumni Association Award. In 2008, he was a finalist for Harvard Law School’s Sacks-Freund Teaching Award.

Professor Alford has delivered endowed lectureships at leading universities around the world and serves on university advisory boards and the editorial boards of learned journals in several jurisdictions. A member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the National Committee on US-China relations, Professor Alford has been a dispute resolution panelist under the U.S.-Canada Free Trade Agreement and the North American Free Trade Agreement. He has served as a consultant or advisor to multilateral organizations, various offices of the United States government, members of Congress, foreign governments, foundations, companies and not-for-profit organizations.

His books include To Steal a Book is an Elegant Offense: Intellectual Property Law in Chinese Civilization (Stanford University Press 1995), Raising the Bar: The Emerging Legal Profession in East Asia (Harvard East Asian Legal Studies 2007), 残疾人法律保障机制研究 (A Study of Legal Mechanisms to Protect Persons with Disabilities) (Huaxia Press 2008, with Wang Liming and Ma Yu’er), Prospects for the Professions in China (Routledge 2011, with William Kirby and Kenneth Winston) and Taiwan and International Human Rights: A Story of Transformation (Springer 2018, with Jerome Cohen and Lo Chang-fa).

Professor Alford is a graduate of Amherst College (B.A.), the University of Cambridge (LL.B.), Yale University (graduate degrees in History and in East Asian Studies) and Harvard Law School (J.D.).

Chris Bavitz
Harvard Law School
Chris BavitzHarvard Law School

Christopher T. Bavitz is the WilmerHale Clinical Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. He is also Managing Director of HLS’s Cyberlaw Clinic, based at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society. And, he is a Faculty Co-Director of the Berkman Klein Center. Chris teaches the Counseling and Legal Strategy in the Digital Age and Music & Digital Media seminars, and he concentrates his practice activities on intellectual property and media law (particularly in the areas of music, entertainment, and technology).

He oversees many of the Cyberlaw Clinic’s projects relating to copyright, speech, advising of startups, and the use of technology to support access to justice, and he serves as the HLS Dean’s Designate to Harvard’s Innovation Lab. Chris's research and related work at the Berkman Klein Center addresses intermediary liability and online content takedown regimes as well as regulatory, ethical, and governance issues associated with technologies that incorporate algorithms, machine learning, and artificial intelligence.

Chris's research and related work at the Berkman Klein Center addresses intermediary liability and online content takedown regimes as well as regulatory, ethical, and governance issues associated with algorithms, machine learning, and artificial intelligence.

Chris received his B.A., cum laude, and Certificate in Peace and Justice Studies from Tufts University in 1995 and his J.D. from University of Michigan Law School in 1998.

Matthew Cook
Harvard Library
Matthew CookHarvard Library

Matthew Cook is a Digital Scholarship Program Manager for the Harvard Library. In this role, he creates digital tools and supports faculty, staff, and students in the use of emerging computational methods. Before coming to Harvard, he worked as Head of Emerging Technologies for the University of Oklahoma Libraries. Cook’s interests include digital scholarship and 3D technologies, including virtual reality.

His work has been published in the Journal of Academic Librarianship, Journal of Library Administration, and other journals.

He holds an MLIS from the School of Library and Information Science at the University of Oklahoma.

Sebastian Diaz
Technology Coordinator
Sebastian DiazTechnology Coordinator

Sebastian Diaz is the Berkman Klein Center's Directory of Technology and he coordinates and advises the Program in Islamic Law on its digital projects. He guides the Berkman Klein Center's IT enterprise through a landscape of ever-changing technology and priorities. Sebastian manages its technology group, which consists of a Harvard renowned development team, an infrastructure and workplace computing team, and a technical project management team.

Sebastian received his B.A. in Biology and French Literature from Williams College.

Gayle Fischer
Librarian for Islamic Law, HLS
Gayle FischerLibrarian for Islamic Law, HLS

Gayle Fischer joined the Harvard Law School Library in 2016 as the Librarian for Islamic Law. She is primarily responsible for the selection, cataloging, and management of materials for the Islamic and Middle Eastern law collections, in addition to providing reference and instruction services. As a member of the Middle East Librarians Association, she serves on the Web and Social Media Committee and the Metrics Working Group. Her professional and research interests include digital scholarship/digital humanities, ontology(-ies), and Arabic poetry.

She obtained her B.A. in Philosophy and Arabic Language and Literature from Portland State University and holds an M.A. in Middle Eastern Studies and an M.S.I.S. from the University of Texas at Austin. 

Jessica Fjeld
Cyberlaw Clinic
Jessica FjeldCyberlaw Clinic

Jessica Fjeld is a Clinical Instructor at Harvard Law School’s Cyberlaw Clinic and serves as the Clinic’s Assistant Director. She is also a Lecturer on Law at HLS. She works in diverse areas including intellectual property, media and entertainment (particularly public media), freedom of expression, and law and policy relating to government and nonprofit entities. She works with SHARIAsource on copyright law and matters of intellectual property and technology. 

She received a JD from Columbia Law School, where she was a James Kent Scholar and Managing Editor of the Journal of Law and the Arts; an MFA in Poetry from the University of Massachusetts; and a BA from Columbia University.

Kevin Garewal
HLS Library
Kevin GarewalHLS Library

Kevin Garewal is the Associate Director for Collection Development and Digital Initiatives at the Harvard Law School Library. He works with the Program in Islamic Law on the StackLife Digital Library project and on other digitization efforts. Before joining Harvard Law School Library, Garewal worked at the University of Akron, the Cleveland Marshall College of Law, and Harvard Business School.

His writing has appeared in the Journal of Academic Librarianship and Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Electronic Reserve, and he has presented at several regional and national conferences. 

Elizabeth Hess
Executive Director, IQSS
Elizabeth HessExecutive Director, IQSS

Elizabeth Hess is the Executive Director of the Institute for Quantitative Social Science (IQSS). In partnership with the IQSS Faculty Director, Gary King, she is responsible for overall strategic, programmatic, and financial management of IQSS, working across the organization to ensure delivery of first-class research and administrative infrastructure to support its constituents. In addition, she oversees programmatic activities including software development projects, cloud computing resources, internal and external collaborations, and new program development. 

Elizabeth graduated from the University of Pennsylvania and earned a masters degree from Harvard’s Graduate School of Education.  She is actively pursuing a Sustainability Degree from Harvard University’s Extension School. 

Jocelyn Kennedy
HLS Library
Jocelyn KennedyHLS Library

Jocelyn Kennedy is the Executive Director of the Harvard Law School Library where she oversees the day to day operations of the law library. Prior to joining the Harvard Law School Library, Kennedy served as the Library Director at the University of Connecticut School of Law, and was the faculty research librarian at the University of Michigan. Prior to her career in librarianship, she served as a congressional staff and was a law clerk for the New Hampshire Superior Court. An expert in legal research, she is interested in the impact the evolution of search platforms has on the habits of legal researchers. She is also researching the disparity in promotion trajectory between men and women in the field of librarianship, a workforce dominated by females.

She has a JD from the University of New Hampshire and an MLIS from the University of Washington.

Gary King
Harvard University
Gary KingHarvard University

Gary King is the Albert J. Weatherhead III University Professor and the Director of the Institute for Quantitative Social Science (IQSS) at Harvard University. One of the most influential political scientists of his generation, his work has been influential in fields from legislative redistricting to public health programs, and from social security to government censorship.

He is the author of several books and articles, including A Solution to the Ecological Inference Problem: Reconstructing Individual Behavior from Aggregate Data (Princeton University Press 1997) and Unifying Political Methodology: The Likelihood Theory of Statistical Inference (Cambridge University Press 1989). He is also the co-founder of several technology firms, including Crimson Hexagon (now part of Brandwatch), Learning Catalytics (now part of Pearson), OpenScholar, Perusall, and Thresher.

He graduated with his PhD from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. More information is available at King's faculty website.

Thomas Ma
Harvard Library
Thomas MaHarvard Library

Thomas Ma is a Cataloging Manager in Metadata Creation for Professional Schools at Harvard Library. He has worked in the library system at Harvard since 1999, with experience at Harvard Law School Library and other libraries.

He holds an MA and an MLIS.

Rashmi Singhal
Harvard Library
Rashmi SinghalHarvard Library

Rashmi Singhal is the Director of Arts and Humanities Research Computing at Harvard University. With a background in software development, she works to promote and expand the use of digital humanities methods in teaching and research. Singhal previously worked on the HarvardX online learning platform, and before coming to Harvard, she worked at the New England Journal of Medicine, Library of Congress, and Tufts University.

She holds a BS in Computer Science and Archaeology and a MS in Computer Science, both from Tufts University.

Martha Whitehead
Harvard Library
Martha WhiteheadHarvard Library

Martha Whitehead is the Vice President for the Harvard Library and University Librarian, and Roy E. Larsen Librarian for the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, at Harvard University. Before coming to Harvard, she was the Vice-Provost (Digital Planning) and University Librarian at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. She also worked for 19 years at the University of British Columbia Library in Vancouver. Whitehead is the past president of the Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL), and she received CARL Distinguished Service to Research Librarianship Award in 2019.

Her work has been published in the Journal of Academic Librarianship and other journals, and she holds a BA and MLS from the University of British Columbia.

Suzanne Wones
Harvard Library
Suzanne WonesHarvard Library

Suzanne Wones is the Associate University Librarian for Digital Strategies and Innovation at Harvard Library. In this role, she leads the library’s data, technology, and digital strategy efforts. Before her current role, she served as the Executive Director of the Harvard Law School Library from 2012 to 2015, and previously worked in other positions in the libraries at Harvard University.

Suzanne earned her MS in Information, Library and Information Services from the University of Michigan, and holds other degrees from the University of New Hampshire and University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

Jonathan Zittrain
Harvard University
Jonathan ZittrainHarvard University

Jonathan Zittrain is the George Bemis Professor of International Law at Harvard Law School and the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, and Professor of Computer Science at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. He is also the Director of the Harvard Law School Library and Vice Dean for Library and Information Resources, and he is Co-Founder, Director, and Faculty Chair of the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society.

Zittrain conducts research, writes, and teaches courses on cyber law, intellectual property, privacy law, artificial intelligence, and other topics. He is the author of The Future of the Internet and How to Stop It (Yale University Press 2008), and his articles have appeared in academic journals, including the Harvard Law Review, Harvard Journal of Law and Technology, and University of Chicago Law Review, and in other publications, including The Atlantic and The New York Times

He holds a bachelor's summa cum laude in cognitive science and artificial intelligence from Yale Universityin 1991,  a J.D. magna cum laude from Harvard Law School in 1995, and a master of public administration from Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government in 1995.

More information is available on his website, www.jz.org.

Carolynn Miller
Carolynn Miller

Carolynn Miller (she/her/hers) supports the Program in Islamic Law as a Human Resources Business Partner and is very interested to learn more about the research of the program. Carolynn has been with Harvard Law School since 2019. Prior work experience has been in higher education, human services, faith organizations, and healthcare. After living in multiple parts of the U.S., and visiting 35 of the 50 states (so far) she is happy to live within a mile of the shore and to be back home in southern New England. Her intellectual curiosity led her to pursue a B.S.W., M.P.A., M.I.L.S. (Information Science program), and a M.Div. While she has read the Qur’an, and took an introductory course in Islam while in seminary, she has much more to learn.

Research Fellows

M Issam Eido
MESA Global Academy Fellow, 2020-2022
M Issam EidoMESA Global Academy Fellow, 2020-2022

Dr. Issam Eido is a Global Academy Scholar in partnership with the Middle East Studies Association (MESA). He is also a Senior Lecturer in Arabic Languages and Literature at Vanderbilt University Department of Religious Studies.. Prior to the Syrian uprising, Eido served as a lecturer in the faculty of Islamic Studies in the Department of Qur'an and Hadīth Studies at the University of Damascus.

Eido's research focuses on the Qur'an in late antiquity, Hadīth Studies, Sufism. His teaching interests focus on Modern and Classical Arabic language, Arabic Literature, Islamic Studies, and Qur'ānic Arabic

Eido received his Ph.D. from the Department of Qur'anic Studies at Damascus University in 2010.

Hedayat Heikal
Research Fellow, 2021-2022
Hedayat HeikalResearch Fellow, 2021-2022

Hedayat Heikal is a Research Fellow at the Program in Islamic Law and a Climenko Fellow and Lecturer on Law at Harvard Law School. She served as a Research Scholar in Law and the inaugural Islamic Law and Civilization Research Fellow at Yale Law School, a Distinguished Visiting Professor at the American University in Cairo, as well as a Graduate Program Fellow at Harvard Law School. Her academic work focuses on comparative constitutional law, the rise of the administrative state, and Middle Eastern and Islamic law. Between 2009 and 2013, she practiced as a litigation, arbitration, and enforcement attorney at Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP in New York, representing clients on a wide array of disputes and regulatory matters.

She recently completed a  dissertation titled “Beyond Juristocracy: The Rise and Fall of Judicial Activism on National Identity Questions in the Middle East.”

Hedayat also holds a Doctor of Law (J.D.) magna cum laude from Harvard Law School and a Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) summa cum laude from the American University in Cairo. 

Mohammad Abderrazzaq
Research Affiliate, 2020-2022
Mohammad AbderrazzaqResearch Affiliate, 2020-2022

Mohammad A. Abderrazzaq is a Research Affiliate at the Program in Islamic Law. He has also been a contributing editor for the Sharia Source Project at Harvard Law School. In addition to his research in Islamic legal theory, Mohammad has taught courses on Islam in America, Islamic intellectual history, Islamic law, Islamic history, and Qur’anic exegesis.

His dissertation was a study of the development of maqāṣid juridical theory, which he is preparing for publication under the title The Higher Objectives of Islamic Law: The Development of Maqāṣid Theory from al-Shāṭibī to Ibn ʿĀshūr and the Contemporary Maqāṣid Movement. Mohammad is also an editor for a book series treating the maqāṣid thought of premodern and modern legal figures.

He received his PhD in Near Eastern Studies from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. 

Students

Omar Abdel-Ghaffar
Research Assistant, 2020-Present
Omar Abdel-GhaffarResearch Assistant, 2020-Present

Omar Abdel-Ghaffar is a PhD Candidate in the History and Middle East Studies program at Harvard's Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

Stephanie Gullo
Research Assistant, 2020-Present
Stephanie GulloResearch Assistant, 2020-Present

Stephanie Gullo is a rising 2L at Harvard Law School.

Abdelrahman Mahmoud
Research Assistant, 2020-Present
Abdelrahman MahmoudResearch Assistant, 2020-Present

Abdelrahman Mahmoud is a PhD Candidate in the History and Middle East Studies program at Harvard's Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

Cem Tecimer
Research Assistant, 2016-Present
Cem TecimerResearch Assistant, 2016-Present

Cem Tecimer is an SJD Candidate at Harvard Law School.

Marzieh Tofighi Darian
Program Student Fellow, 2018-Present
Marzieh Tofighi DarianProgram Student Fellow, 2018-Present

Marzieh Tofighi Darian is an SJD Candidate at Harvard Law School.

Aiyanna Sanders
Research Assistant, 2020-Present
Aiyanna SandersResearch Assistant, 2020-Present

Aiyanna Sanders is a JD student at Harvard Law School.

Karina Halevy
Research Assistant, Summer 2021
Karina HalevyResearch Assistant, Summer 2021

Karina Halevy is an undergraduate student majoring in Applied Math and Computer Science. She's interested in computational linguistics, data science for social good, education, and tech ethics.

Zahra Rasouli
Research Assistant, Summer 2021
Zahra RasouliResearch Assistant, Summer 2021

Zahra Rasouli is a Research Assistant at the Program in Islamic Law, Summer 2021. She works on the Courts&Canons (CnC) project, using machine learning to help develop the CnC-Qayyim data analytics tool. She holds a Master of Theological Studies degree from Harvard Divinity School (2021), and Bachelor of Science in physics with a minor in political science from MIT (2019). 

Advisors

Naz K. Modirzadeh
Professor of Practice, Harvard Law School, Advisory Council
Naz K. ModirzadehProfessor of Practice, Harvard Law School, Advisory Council

Naz K. Modirzadeh is the founding Director of the Harvard Law School Program on International Law and Armed Conflict (HLS PILAC). In May 2016, she was appointed as a Professor of Practice at Harvard Law School. In the Spring 2019 term, she will teach International Humanitarian Law/Laws of War, Counterterrorism and International Law, and Public International Law. At HLS PILAC, Modirzadeh is responsible for overall direction of the Program, contributing to its cutting-edge research initiatives and briefing senior decision-makers.

In addition to taking part in several expert advisory groups for UN research initiatives, Modirzadeh is a non-resident Research Associate in the Humanitarian Policy Group of the Overseas Development Institute and a non-resident Senior Fellow at the Lieber Institute for Law and Land Warfare at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. She is also on the Board of Trustees of the International Crisis Group, on the Advisory Board of Geneva Call, and on the Board of Directors of the International Association of Professionals in Humanitarian Assistance and Protection (PHAP).

Her current scholarship focuses on normative and practical dimensions of the U.S. “War on Terror” and other contemporary challenges concerning international law and armed conflict. She frequently contributes to academic and professional initiatives in the areas of humanitarian action, counterterrorism, and the laws of war. 

She received her undergraduate degree from the University of California, Berkeley and her J.D. from Harvard Law School.

Khaled Abou El Fadl
Professor of Law, UCLA, Editorial Board, Harvard Series in Islamic Law

Khaled Abou El FadlProfessor of Law, UCLA, Editorial Board, Harvard Series in Islamic Law


Dr. Khaled Abou El Fadl is one of the world’s leading authorities on Islamic law and Islam, and a prominent scholar in the field of human rights.  He is the Omar and Azmeralda Alfi Distinguished Professor in Islamic Law at the UCLA School of Law where he teaches International Human Rights, Islamic Jurisprudence, National Security Law, Law and Terrorism, Islam and Human Rights, Political Asylum and Political Crimes and Legal Systems.  He is also the Chair of the Islamic Studies Interdepartmental Program at UCLA. 

Among his many honors and distinctions, Dr. Abou El Fadl was awarded the University of Oslo Human Rights Award, the Leo and Lisl Eitinger Prize in 2007, and named a Carnegie Scholar in Islamic Law in 2005.  He was previously appointed by President George W. Bush to serve on the U.S. Commission for International Religious Freedom, and also served as a member of the board of directors of Human Rights Watch.  He continues to serve on the advisory board of Middle East Watch (part of Human Rights Watch) and regularly works with human rights organizations such as Amnesty International and the Lawyers’ Committee for Human Rights (Human Rights First) as an expert in a wide variety of cases involving human rights, terrorism, political asylum, and international and commercial law.  In 2005, he was also listed as one of LawDragon’s Top 500 Lawyers in the Nation.

He is the author of many books and articles, including Reasoning with God: Reclaiming Shari'ah in the Modern Age (Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2014) and Rebellion and Violence in Islamic Law (Cambridge University Press, 2001).

Abou El Fadl holds a B.A. in Political Science from Yale University, a J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Law School, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Islamic law from Princeton University.

Aslı Bâli
Professor of Law, UCLA, Editorial Board, Harvard Series in Islamic Law

Aslı BâliProfessor of Law, UCLA, Editorial Board, Harvard Series in Islamic Law


Professor Bâli is Professor of Law at the UCLA School of Law, Faculty Director of the UCLA Law Promise Institute for Human Rights, and Director of the UCLA Center for Near Eastern Studies. She currently teaches Public International LawInternational Human Rights, a seminar on the Laws of War and a Perspectives seminar on Third World Approaches to International Law.

During law school, she served as an editor of the Yale Law Journal and the Yale Journal of International Law, and as an articles editor of the Yale Journal of Human Rights & Development. After law school, she worked for the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights and as an associate at Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP, where she specialized in international transactions and sovereign representation. Bâli currently serves as co-chair of the Advisory Board for the Middle East Division of Human Rights Watch and as a national board member of the Middle East Studies Association. Immediately prior to her appointment at UCLA, Bâli served as the Irving S. Ribicoff Fellow in Law at the Yale Law School.

Bâli’s principal scholarly interests lie in two areas: public international law—including human rights law and the law of the international security order—and comparative constitutional law, with a focus on the Middle East. Her current research examines questions of constitutional design in religiously-divided societies. She has previously written on the nuclear non-proliferation regime, international legal arguments concerning humanitarian intervention, and the role of judicial independence in constitutional transitions.

Bâli’s recent scholarship has appeared in the American Journal of International Law UnboundInternational Journal of Constitutional LawUCLA Law ReviewYale Journal of International LawCornell Journal of International LawVirginia Journal of International LawGeopoliticsStudies in LawPolitics and Society and edited volumes published by Cambridge University Press and Oxford University Press.

Bâli is a graduate of Williams College, the University of Cambridge where she was a Herschel Smith Scholar, Yale Law School and Princeton University, where she earned her Ph.D. in Politics. 

 

 

Maribel Fierro
Research Professor, Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Editorial Board, Harvard Series in Islamic Law

Maribel FierroResearch Professor, Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Editorial Board, Harvard Series in Islamic Law


Maribel Fierro is Research Professor in the history of Islam and Islamic Law at the Humanities branch of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) in Madrid, Spain. She has held fellowships and research positions at the Islamic Legal Studies Program at Harvard Law School, at the Institute for Advanced Studies at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, at the University of Chicago, and at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton.

She has published works on The Almohad Revolution: Politics and Religion in the Islamic West during the Twelfth-Thirteenth Centuries (Burlington, VT: Variorum, 2012), Abd al-Rahman III: The First Cordoban Caliph (Oneworld, 2005), among dozens of other books, articles, and translations of early Islamic historical and legal works.

Fierro received her doctorate degree at the Complutense University of Madrid, Spain.

Cemal Kafadar
Professor of Turkish Studies, Harvard University, Editorial Board, Harvard Series in Islamic Law

Cemal KafadarProfessor of Turkish Studies, Harvard University, Editorial Board, Harvard Series in Islamic Law


Cemal Kafadar is the Vehbi Koç Professor of Turkish Studies at Harvard University. Prof. Kafadar is interested in the social and cultural history of the Middle East and southeastern Europe in the late medieval/early modern era. He teaches courses on Ottoman history, urban space, travel, popular culture, history and cinema.

His latest publications include “How Dark is the History of the Night, How Black the Story of Coffee, How Bitter the Tale of Love: the Changing Measure of Leisure and Pleasure in Early Modern Istanbul” and “Evliya Celebi in Dalmatia: an Ottoman Traveler’s Encounters with the Arts of the Franks.” 

Kafadar graduated from Robert College, then Hamilton College, and received his PhD from the McGill University Institute of Islamic Studies in 1987.

Hossein Modarressi
Professor of Near Eastern Studies, Princeton University, Editorial Board, Harvard Series in Islamic Law

Hossein ModarressiProfessor of Near Eastern Studies, Princeton University, Editorial Board, Harvard Series in Islamic Law


Hossein Modarressi is the Bayard Dodge Professor of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University. His current research centers on the two fields of Islamic law and Shi'ite doctrine, with manuscripts to be completed in both.

Modarressi is the author of many books and articles in English, Arabic, and Persian. His books in English include Kharaj in Islamic Law (London, 1983), An Introduction to Shi'i Law (London, 1984), Crisis and Consolidation in the Formative Period of Shi'ite Islam (Princeton, 1993), and Tradition and Survival, a Bibliographical Survey of Early Shi’ite Literature (Oxford, 2003).

He attended the Islamic seminary at Qom where he received a complete traditional Islamic education in Islamic philosophy, theology and law, ending with a certificate of ijtihad. He also taught there for many years before pursuing his secular education which ended in 1982 with a D. Phil. from Oxford University.

Roy Mottahedeh
Professor Emeritus of History, Harvard University, Editorial Board, Harvard Series in Islamic Law

Roy MottahedehProfessor Emeritus of History, Harvard University, Editorial Board, Harvard Series in Islamic Law


Roy Parviz Mottahedeh is the Gurney Professor of History, Emeritus, at Harvard University.  He served as the Director of the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at Harvard University from 1987 to 1990 and founded the Harvard Middle East and Islamic Review as a medium for Harvard students and teachers to publish their work. He was elected a member of the Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Council on Foreign Relations and has served as a series editor for several academic publishers. In 1994 he was appointed Gurney Professor of History. Together with Angeliki Laiou he co-edited The Crusades from the Perspective of Byzantium and the Muslim World (2001). His book Lessons in Islamic Jurisprudence, published in 2003, studies the philosophy of Islamic law as taught in Shi’ite seminaries. Professor Mottahedeh received an honorary degree from the University of Lund, Sweden, in 2006. He served as Director of the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Islamic Studies Program at Harvard from 2006 to 2011.

Professor Mottahedeh is the author of numerous articles that demonstrate his wide range of interests from the Abbasid period in the eighth century to Islamic revival movements of the present day. One of his most widely distributed articles, which has been translated into many languages, was his critique of Huntington’s theory of the clash of civilizations. Professor Mottahedeh’s other publications consider such diverse topics as the transmission of learning in the Muslim world, the social bonds that connected people in the early Islamic Middle East, the theme of “wonders” in The Thousand and One Nights, the concept of jihad in the early Islamic period, and perceptions of Persepolis among later Muslims.

In 1960 he graduated magna cum laude in history from Harvard College and was awarded a Shaw Traveling Fellowship which he used to explore Europe, the Middle East and Afghanistan. He then undertook a second B.A. in Persian and Arabic at the University of Cambridge in the UK, where he received the E. G. Browne Prize. In 1962 he returned to Harvard for doctoral studies in history, where he studied with Sir Hamilton Gibb and Richard Frye. He was elected a Junior Fellow in the Harvard Society of Fellows and received his PhD in 1970 for a dissertation on Buyid administration.

Mathieu Tillier
Professor of History of Medieval Islam, Sorbonne University, Editorial Board, Harvard Series in Islamic Law

Mathieu TillierProfessor of History of Medieval Islam, Sorbonne University, Editorial Board, Harvard Series in Islamic Law


Mathieu Tillier is Professor of History of Medieval Islam at Sorbonne University. 

His research interests are the history of Muslim and Christian judicial institutions, history of prisons in medieval Islam, history of Islamic law and canon law, and Syriac historiography.

Tillier is the author of  L’invention du cadi. La justice des musulmans, des juifs et des chrétiens aux premiers siècles de l’Islam (Publications de la Sorbonne, Paris, 2017) among much more. 

M. Qasim Zaman
Professor of Near Eastern Studies and Religion, Princeton University, Editorial Board, Harvard Series in Islamic Law

M. Qasim ZamanProfessor of Near Eastern Studies and Religion, Princeton University, Editorial Board, Harvard Series in Islamic Law


Muhammad Qasim Zaman joined is the Robert H. Niehaus '77 Professor of Near Eastern Studies and Religion at Princeton.

He has written on the relation­ship between religious and political institutions in medieval and modern Islam, on social and legal thought in the modern Muslim world, on institutions and traditions of learning in Islam, and on the flow of ideas between South Asia and the Arab Middle East. He is the author of Religion and Politics under the Early Abbasids (1997), The Ulama in Contemporary Islam: Custodians of Change (2002), Ashraf Ali Thanawi: Islam in Modern South Asia(2008), Modern Islamic Thought in a Radical Age: Religious Authority and Internal Criticism (2012), and Islam in Pakistan: A History (2018). With Robert W. Hefner, he is also the co-editor of Schooling Islam: The Culture and Politics of Modern Muslim Education (2007); with Roxanne L. Euben, of Princeton Readings in Islamist Thought(2009); and, as associate editor, with Gerhard Bowering et al., of the Princeton Encyclopedia of Islamic Political Thought (2013). Among his current projects is a book on South Asia and the wider Muslim world in the eighteenth and the nineteenth centuries.

Zaman has a Ph.D. from McGill University.

Will Smiley
Assistant Professor in Humanities, University of New Hampshire, Advisory Council
Will SmileyAssistant Professor in Humanities, University of New Hampshire, Advisory Council

Will Smiley is Assistant Professor in the Humanities Program at the University of New Hampshire. He is a historian of the Middle East, Eurasia, the Ottoman Empire, and international law; previously served as an Assistant Professor of History and Humanities at Reed College; and has held post-doctoral fellowships at Princeton and New York University.

His first book, From Slaves to Prisoners of War: The Ottoman Empire, Russia, and International Law (Oxford University Press, 2018), examines the emergence of rules of warfare surrounding captivity and slavery in the context of the centuries-long rivalry between the Ottoman and Russian empires, which defined the future of the Middle East and Eurasia. His other publications include articles in the Law and History Review, International Journal of Middle East Studies, Journal of the History of International Law, Journal of the Ottoman and Turkish Studies Association, Journal of Ottoman Studies, Turkish Historical Review, and International History Review.

He received a BA from Hillsdale College, an MA from the University of Utah, a PhD from the University of Cambridge, and a JD from Yale Law School.

Eleanor Ellis
Editor, Harvard Series in Islamic Law, 2021-
Eleanor EllisEditor, Harvard Series in Islamic Law, 2021-

Eleanor Ellis received her AM in Middle Eastern Studies from Harvard's Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

Affiliates

Rosie Bsheer
Harvard University
Rosie BsheerHarvard University

Rosie Bsheer is an historian of the modern Middle East and Assistant Professor of History at Harvard University. She comes to Harvard University from Yale University, where she was Assistant Professor of History (2014–2018). She is the recipient of the Poorvu Family Award for Interdisciplinary Teaching at Yale University (2017) and Yale College’s Sarai Ribicoff ‘75 Award for the Encouragement of Teaching (2018).

Bsheer’s work has been supported by the Mellon Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS), the Social Science Research Council (SSRC), the Whiting Foundation, and the Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life.  Her teaching and research interests center on Arab intellectual and social movements, petro-capitalism and state formation, and the production of historical knowledge and commemorative spaces. 

She is the author of Archive Wars: The Politics of History in Saudi Arabia (Stanford University Press, October 2020). he is Associate Producer of the 2007 Oscar-nominated film& My Country, My Country, Co-Editor of Jadaliyya E-zine, and Associate Editor of Tadween Publishing.

She received her Ph.D. in History from Columbia University (2014).

William A. Graham
Harvard Divinity School (emeritus)
William A. GrahamHarvard Divinity School (emeritus)

William A. Graham is Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor, and Murray A. Albertson Professor of Middle Eastern Studies (Faculty of Arts and Sciences). Graham served as Dean of Harvard Divinity School from 2002 to 2012, when he stepped down to return to research and teaching. His scholarly work has focused on early Islamic religious history and textual traditions (Qur’an and Hadith), and on topics in the global history of religion.

His book Divine Word and Prophetic Word in Early Islam was awarded the American Council of Learned Societies History of Religions Prize in 1978. He is the author of Beyond the Written Word: Oral Aspects of Scripture in the History of Religion (1987) and Islamic and Comparative Religious Studies(2010). He has co-authored three books and is also the author of numerous articles and reviews.

He is a summa graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and holds honorary doctorates from UNC and Lehigh University.

Baber Johansen
Harvard Divinity School (emeritus)
Baber JohansenHarvard Divinity School (emeritus)

Baber Johansen was appointed Professor of Islamic Religious Studies at Harvard Divinity School in 2005. Prior to his appointment, he served as Directeur d’études at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (Centre d’étude des normes juridiques), Paris (1995–2005), and Professor for Islamic Studies at the Freie Universität Berlin (1972–1995). In 2006 he was appointed an affiliated professor at Harvard Law School and acting director of its Islamic Legal Studies Program from 2006 to 2010. In 2007 he was affiliated with the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, and from July 2010 to June 2013, he was the director of the Center for Middle Eastern Studies. He is also a faculty associate of Harvard’s Weatherhead Center for International Affairs and a member of its Executive Committee.

His research and teaching focus on the relationship between religion and law in the classical and the modern Muslim world. His book Muhammad Husain Haikal Europa und der Orient im Weltbild eines ägyptischen Liberalen (1967), translated into Arabic in Abu Dhabi in 2010, examines twentieth-century liberal interpretations of Islam; Islam und Staat (1982) looks at modern Muslim debates on state models; and Islamic Law on Land Tax and Rent (1988) considers long-term changes in classical and postclassical legal doctrine. Contingency in a Sacred Law: Legal and Ethical Norms in the Muslim Fiqh (1999) focuses on law, social practice, and ethics in Islam.

Johansen has a PhD in Habilitation in Islamic Studies from the Freie Universität Berlin.

Cemal Kafadar
Harvard History Department
Cemal KafadarHarvard History Department

Cemal Kafadar is the Vehbi Koç Professor of Turkish Studies at Harvard University. Prof. Kafadar is interested in the social and cultural history of the Middle East and southeastern Europe in the late medieval/early modern era. He teaches courses on Ottoman history, urban space, travel, popular culture, history and cinema.

His latest publications include “How Dark is the History of the Night, How Black the Story of Coffee, How Bitter the Tale of Love: the Changing Measure of Leisure and Pleasure in Early Modern Istanbul” and “Evliya Celebi in Dalmatia: an Ottoman Traveler’s Encounters with the Arts of the Franks.” 

Kafadar graduated from Robert College, then Hamilton College, and received his PhD from the McGill University Institute of Islamic Studies in 1987.

Ousmane Kane
Harvard Divinity School
Ousmane KaneHarvard Divinity School

Ousmane Kane, a scholar of Islamic studies and comparative and Islamic politics, joined Harvard Divinity School in July 2012 as the first Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Professor of Contemporary Islamic Religion and Society at HDS. Since 2002, he was an associate professor of international and public affairs at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs. He is a member of a number of professional organizations, including the African Studies Association of North America and the Council for the Development of Social and Economic Research in Africa. Kane studies the history of Islamic religious institutions and organizations since the eighteenth century, and he is engaged in documenting the intellectual history of Islam in Africa.

Kane has also focused on the phenomenon of Muslim globalization. His book Homeland Is the Arena: Religion, Transnationalism and the Integration of Senegalese Immigrants in America (Oxford University Press, 2010) looks at the community of Senegalese immigrants to the United States in New York and the importance these immigrants assign to their religious communities for the organization of their lives. His other books include Muslim Modernity in Postcolonial Nigeria (Brill, 2003), Beyond Timbuktu: An Intellectual History of Muslim West Africa (Harvard University Press, 2016), and, most recently, Islamic Scholarship in Africa. New Directions and Global Contexts (James Currey, 2021). He has published articles in the Harvard International ReviewPolitique étrangèreAfrique contemporaineAfrican Journal of International AffairsCahiers d’Etudes AfricainesIslam et Sociétés au Sud du Sahara, and Religions.

Kane received a Bachelor of Arts in Arabic and a Masters in Islamic Studies from the Institut national des langues et civilisations orientales at the University of the Sorbonne Nouvelle, and an M. Phil and a Ph.D in Political Science and Middle Eastern Studies from the Institut d'Etudes Politiques de Paris.

Asim Ijaz Khwaja
Harvard Kennedy School
Asim Ijaz KhwajaHarvard Kennedy School

Asim Ijaz Khwaja is the Sumitomo-Foundation for Advanced Studies on International Development Professor of International Finance and Development at the Harvard Kennedy School, and Co-Director of Evidence for Policy Design (EPoD). He was selected as a Carnegie Scholar in 2009 to pursue research on how religious institutions impact individual beliefs.

His areas of interest include economic development, finance, education, political economy, institutions, and contract theory/mechanism design. His research combines extensive fieldwork, rigorous empirical analysis, and microeconomic theory to answer questions that are motivated by and engage with policy. His recent work ranges from understanding market failures in emerging financial markets to examining the private education market in low-income countries.

Khwaja received BS degrees in economics and in mathematics with computer science from MIT and a PhD in economics from Harvard.

Tarek Masoud
Harvard Kennedy School
Tarek MasoudHarvard Kennedy School

Tarek Masoud is the Sultan of Oman Associate Professor of International Relations at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. He is a 2009 Carnegie Scholar, a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations, a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Democracy, and the recipient of grants from the National Science Foundation and the Paul and Daisy Soros foundation, among others. His research focuses on the role of religion in the Muslim world’s political development.

He is the author of Counting Islam: Religion, Class, and Elections in Egypt (Cambridge University Press, 2014), the co-author of The Arab Spring: Pathways of Repression and Reform (Oxford University Press, 2015), as well as of several articles and book chapters.

He holds an AB from Brown and a PhD from Yale, both in political science.

Malika Zeghal
Harvard NELC Department
Malika ZeghalHarvard NELC Department

Malika Zeghal is the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Professor in contemporary Islamic thought and life at Harvard and studies religion through the lens of Islam and power. She is particularly interested in Islamist movements and in the institutionalization of Islam in the Muslim world, with special focus on the Middle East and North Africa in the postcolonial period and on Muslim diasporas in North America and Western Europe. She has more general interests in the circulation and role of religious ideologies in situations of conflict and/or dialogue.

She has published a study of central religious institutions in Egypt, Gardiens de l’Islam, (1996), and a volume on Islam and politics in Morocco, Islamism in Morocco: Religion, Authoritarianism, and Electoral Politics (2008), which has won the French Voices-Pen American Center Award. She is currently working on a book on states, secularity, and Islam in the contemporary Arab world. An alumna of the Ecole Normale Supérieure de la Rue d'Ulm (Paris, France),

Malika Zeghal holds a PhD in Political Science from the Institut d'Etudes Politiques de Paris (1994). 

Mohsen Goudarzi
Harvard Divinity School
Mohsen GoudarziHarvard Divinity School

Mohsen Goudarzi is Assistant Professor of Islamic Studies at the Harvard Divinity School. A scholar of the Qur'an and early Islamic history, he has published on the Qur'an's theological and legal dimensions, its relationship to the Bible and post-biblical literature, its reception in Muslim exegesis, and its textual genesis. His current projects include an article that rethinks the Qur’an’s legal philosophy and a monograph that explores the Islamic scripture’s historical vision. 

Goudarzi obtained his PhD from Harvard's Committee on the Study of Religion in 2018, after which he taught as Assistant Professor at the University of Minnesota (Twin Cities) for three years, before joining the Harvard Divinity School in July 2021.