Islamic Legal Genres: Marion Katz

On Wednesday, October 27, 2021 at 12:00-1:00PM US EST via ZoomProfessor Marion Katz (New York University), will speak on the form, function, and historical development of the ṭabaqāt al-fuqahāʾ literature as part of our ongoing monthly lecture series. Prof. Katz is a Professor of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies at NYU, where she has been teaching since 2002. Her research revolves around issues of Islamic law, ethics, gender, and ritual. She received a BA from Yale and a PhD from the University of Chicago.

Registration required

Islamic Law Speaker Series: Yusuf Celik

On Tuesday, October 19, 2021 at 12:00-1:00PM US EST via Zoom, with Dr. Yusuf Celik, will speak about redefining the hermeneutical circle in the age of data science. Dr. Celik is currently the inaugural Data Science Fellow at the Program in Islamic Law at Harvard Law School and at the Institute for Quantitative Social Science at Harvard University. He has previously served as a lecturer and researcher at the University of Utrecht. His research centers on philosophical hermeneutics in the Islamic tradition and on Continental philosophy. He  has also been active for years in the field of software engineering and is currently exploring ways to synthesize insights from philosophical hermeneutics with deep learning and other new technologies. Dr. Celik received his PhD from the University of Edinburgh in 2020.

Registration is required

Islamic Legal Genres: Anas Sarmini

On Wednesday, September 29, 2021 at 12:00-1:00PM US EST via Zoom, Professor Anas Sarmini, will speak on the form, function, and historical development of ikhtilāf al-fuqahāʾ as a genre as part of our ongoing monthly lecture series. Dr. Sarmini is an Assistant Professor at the Istanbul 29 May University. His research focuses on ḥadīth, uṣūl al-fiqh (jurisprudence), and Arabic. He completed his doctoral degree on ḥadīth and sunna from the University of Jinan in 2015, and a master’s degree on Arabic literature in 2013, and a second master’s degree from the University of Damascus in ḥadīth studies.

Registration is required.

Book Talk: Rachel Scott

On Tuesday, September 14, 2021 12:00-1:00PM US EST via ZoomProfessor Rachel Scott (Virginia Tech) will speak about her new book, Recasting Islamic Law: Religion and the Nation State in Egyptian Constitution Making (Cornell University Press, 2021). In this book, Scott examines the intersection of Islamic law, state law, religion, and culture in the Egyptian nation-building process, highlighting how the sharia, when attached to constitutional commitments, is reshaped into modern Islamic state laws. This event will be moderated by PIL Research Fellow, Dr. Hedayat Heikal.

Registration is required. 

 

Islamic Legal Genres – Walter Edward Young

On Wednesday, August 25, 2021 12-1:30pm EST, Professor Walter Edward Young (McGill University) will present “Form, Function and Historical Development of Genres of Juristic Dialectic (ʿilm al-jadal and ‘ilm al-khilāf),” This lecture is next in our ongoing  Monthly Lectures on Islamic Legal Genres, which is convened by Professors  Hakki ArslanNecmettin Kizilkaya, and Intisar Rabb,  a group of scholars and students of Islamic law and history have been meeting monthly to explore the form and function of genres popular in Islamic law from the fourteenth to nineteenth centuries. The working group hypothesizes that the development of different genres accompanied different functions and diversity of content to match the evolving needs of Islamic law and society. 

You can watch previous lectures here and read their summaries on our blog.  Subscribe to our lists for the latest on this ongoing workshop.

Islamic Legal Genres – Christian Müller

On Wednesday, July 28, 2021 12-1:30pm EST, Professor Christian Muller (CNRS – Paris) will present “Siǧill-s and transformations of the cadi documents in Islamic law (10th-16th centuries),” This lecture is next in our ongoing  Monthly Lectures on Islamic Legal Genres, which is convened by Professors  Hakki ArslanNecmettin Kizilkaya, and Intisar Rabb,  a group of scholars and students of Islamic law and history have been meeting monthly to explore the form and function of genres popular in Islamic law from the fourteenth to nineteenth centuries. The working group hypothesizes that the development of different genres accompanied different functions and diversity of content to match the evolving needs of Islamic law and society. 

You can watch previous lectures here and read their summaries on our blog.  Subscribe to our lists for the latest on this ongoing workshop.